Sunday, August 17, 2014

There’s a blog hop going round!

 

Welcome to the Around the World Creative Blog Hop!!

A couple of weeks ago I was invited by the lovely Teje from Nero’s Post and Patch to join this wonderful Blog Hop going round in Blogland.
I’m almost sure you’ve heard about her blog and read it yourself; if not, please go over there and have a look. She is such a talented lady, and never afraid of taking on something new. If you read her posts about her Fantasy Forest Quilt, you’ll understand what I’m talking about.

Now it’s my turn to answer 4 questions.

1 What am I working on?

This is a the right question at the wrong time. At the moment I’m not really working on any new ideas. After surgery a couple of months ago, focus has been on different things, and as for crafting, I’ve only worked on some projects which were already started.

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A cardigan by Christel Seyfarth; growing very slowly. It’s beautiful, but it really needs attention and concentration.

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Playing with South-American motives and colours.

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Books! Books filled with colours, designs, techniques and the most wonderful creations. I can spend hours browsing and reading, learning about costume history, about which special demands costumes for ballet or circus have, about traditional techniques and colours from all over the world. Fabric and yarn, textiles…. it is just the most wonderful world around.

Hopefully I will get back at actually making things very soon, and then I will have so many new ideas that I’ll probably haven’t time for all of them.

 

2 How does my work differ from others of its genre?

Usually I say it’s playing with colours what I do. Literally. I try to use/make simple designs where the colours can shine.
In this picture I used the colour circle as a basic grid, and I tried to explore the use of larger/smaller pieces of colour.

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In this blanket every circle is made with different shade of 1 colour; very simple idea, but great effect.

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And another sample of using the colour circle.

When it comes to knitting; I work the other way around; quite intricate designs with a simple use of colour. Very often I use selfstriping yarns to obtain wonderful colours.

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The easiest way of playing with colours is to sew strips together, every time just 1 shade different from the previous.

Again, using the colour circle, and going round and round, in the end this results in a very easy, but nice dog pillow:

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These are some examples of how my work is made; in what way it really differs from others is hard to tell. I’m sure lots of it is influenced by all the beautiful things I see on all those wonderful blogs, and of course on Pinterest.

3 Why do I write/create what I do?

It is the reason why I live; this is what I breathe and what I’m made of and for. No other reason than this. I’m sure a lot of people joining this blog hop have already stated this, and I’m no exception.

The downside of this is also that always when I see something in a magazine or a shop, I am confident that I can make it myself. Usually for a much smaller budget, with better finishing an with a few personal details added.

Squint of London can make the most beautiful furniture, way out of my reach, but with a simple chair of IKEA, and samples of upholstery fabric, you can make your own chair.

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But this goes for clothes too; in the catalogue of Odd Molly I found this lovely cardigan, and that was for me the reason I started crochet again.

And many times, I create something because I want to give a special gift to someone; personalized or made for an occasion.

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A cover for my husbands new Ebook.

 

4 How does my writing/creative process work?

There is not just one way this works. Sometimes I have a very clear and detailed idea about what I’m going to make, and then I look for the materials needed.

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This became my own new toiletbag:

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Another time, I’m getting my ideas from a special fabric or yarn, or a theme like Autumn.

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The theme inspired me to make different blocks; applique, machine embroidery and simple patchwork. Only after making these blocks, I had the idea to make a bag like this.

A few years back I wanted to learn a new knitting technique: Fair-Isle. So I bought Alice Starmore’s beautiful book and a few skeins of wool and started a sample. This became eventually my most beloved cowl.

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Well, this was certainly an exercise in self restraint. It’s easy to go on and on about telling and showing. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading this, and I would love to introduce 3 ladies who I admire, and who will be continuing the blog hop:

Lone from Flowermouse Design : this lady totally understands colour, and her designs, both in knitting as in polymer clay are eye candy.

Christelle (Stel) from Haak en Stekie : she is wonderful with crochet, and her stories and pictures about her country are wonderful to read and see.

Esther from Ipatchandquilt : a very versatile lady, who shares her adventures in quilting. Her (paperpiece) designs are wonderful, and she talks about her work with great passion.

You can read their stories next week August 25.

Groetjes, Dorien

6 comments:

mamasmercantile said...

Some amazing creations, quite inspirational.

nerospost said...

Hi Dorien! Wonderful post and so great to see your beautiful work! I'm always so happy to see your colourful and talented Works! Thank you for joining this blog hop and thank you for inspiration! x Teje

Maxine D said...

Thank you for sharing some of yourself Dorien - I have always admired your use of colour!
Blessings
Maxine

Debbie said...

Enjoyed your post AND your lovely use of color!

Mia said...

Hello Dorien,

What a lovely post! I am just stunned by your fair isle skills, that cardigan will be fantastic once finished! And your colors...wow! As a color-lover like me these are such eye candy. Thank you for sharing all this with us.

Have a wonderful day, and I wish you a quick healing after your surgery!

Yours,
Mia

Rike Busch said...

I LOVE this chair!!! What a great idea to pimp it up!!! And all the others are amazing, too.

Greetings, Rike